11 Best Novels of Indian Writers

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Indian literature history is rich with award-winning masterworks. We have writers like Ruskin bond, Arundhati Roy, Rabindranath Tagore and many more to take our Indian writings on the top level. If you love the writings of our Indian authors, then you should read these 11 masterpieces from our Indian authors.

A Fine Balance” by Rohinton Mistry

Author Rohinton Mistry set the story in the time of 1975 wherein an unnamed city, the government has just declared the State of Emergency, in whose upheavals four strangers–a spirited widow, a young student uprooted from his idyllic hill station, and two tailors who have fled the caste violence of their native village–will be thrust together, forced to share one cramped apartment and an uncertain future.

Shortlisted for the Booker Prize in 1996, this book is a gripping account of political, social and economic forces that drove India through the late 20th-century and into its current form.

“The Last Song of Dusk” by Siddharth Dhanvant Shanghvi

The story is of a young woman who is such legendary beauty. The novel follows the blossoming marriage of her through its highs and lows with powerful, addictive prose. Her suitor, Vardhmaan, is a well-to-do handsome doctor. It seems only a fairy-tale marriage could befit such a couple.

The Last Song of Dusk tells the far darker and deeper story of a love shaped by kismet and freighted with tragedy, passion, and loss.

“Palace of Illusions” by Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni

The Hindu mythological epic Mahabharata from the perspective of Draupadi. It’s the story of the journey into exile and war. Draupadi who is famous for having married all five of the Pandava brothers is the protagonist here.

“The great Indian Novel” by Shashi Tharoor

The book is the perfect blend of mythology with history. Shashi Tharoor recreates Hindu epic “The Mahabharat” in the form of 20th century Indian politics. The events and characters from 20th century Indian politics are narrated in the form of Mahabharat. Tharoor directs his hilarious and often outrageous satire as much against Indian foibles and failings as against the bumblings of the British rulers.

“In Custody” by Anita Desai

Author Anita Desai narrates a beautiful and touching story of a boy who is studying Urdu in a small town in India. He got a lifetime opportunity to interview one of the country’s finest Urdu poets, Nur. he sees the project in a way to channel his love for the language in a more meaningful way. But will it happen, or this project will end in disaster?

“The White Tiger” by Aravind Adiga

The white tiger is the story of a complicated man who is a servant, philosopher, entrepreneur, and murderer. The book is a thrilling first-person narrative told from the perspective of Balram Halwai, a young man from a poverty-stricken small village who moves to Delhi to work as a chauffeur for the elite.

“Nectar in a Sieve” by Kamala Markandaya

Acclaimed Indian author Kamala Markandaya’s debut novel, Nectar in a Sieve, is the story of rapidly changing mid-20th-century India, told from the perspective of Rukhmani, a woman from rural and impoverished India. From her arranged marriage to Nathan, a farmer, to the changes brought about by the advent of a large tannery in their village, the novel covers a rich range of subjects with uniquely gripping prose.

“Train to Pakistan” by Khushwant Singh

The books narrate the human perspective of the partition of British India into India and Pakistan. Mostly, we all have heard and read about the Indo-Pak partition in a political manner. But in this book, you will see the story form the human loss perspective. The story narrates about the human loss and horror during partition.

“The Guide” by R.K. Narayan

R.K Narayan shares a pleasant memory of our childhood through ‘Malgudi Days’. The novel follows the story of a Railway Raju, a corrupt tour guide, and the odd sequence of events that go on to make him a spiritual guide and eventually a revered holy man in the country.

“The God of Small Things” by Arundhati Roy

The story is a weird yet fascinating combination of lamentation, mystery, and melancholy. Since the very beginning, we get hypnotized, mesmerized. We realize that we are witnessing something fresh and new having the power to capture our minds. This is the only story of its type. None other will be ever as good as this.

“A Suitable Boy” by Vikram Seth

Vikram Seth’s acclaimed work follows the story of four families in newly independent and post-partition India. Primarily revolving around the journey of Mrs. Rupa Mehra to find ‘a suitable boy’ to marry her daughter, the book meditates on a range of issues from post-partition politics, Hindu-Muslim strife, caste and class tensions, and changing family relationships. At 1,349 pages, Seth’s work is among the longest English language Indian books published in a single volume.

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